Posts Tagged ‘internet freedom’

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Daily International News 02.15.11

February 15, 2011

Daily International News
February 15, 2011

FY2012 Budget
Looking at Budget Cuts with Pennies [ABC]
Highlights of the Obama Budget
[NYT]
Gates on Pentagon Cuts, Implementing DADT, China’s Military Build-up
[PBS]
Obama Budget Escapes Liberal Backlash, for Now
[NYT]
“WHERE IT GOES
” – Wall Street Journal’s calculations of proposed funds by department, compared with 2010: “Education, +21% … Energy, +18% … Veterans Affairs, +11% … State and other international programs, +8% … Treasury, +4% … Interior, no change … Defense, -3% … Health and Human Services, -3% … Housing and Urban Development, -3% … Homeland Security, -4% … Labor, -5% … Transportation, -9% … Agriculture, -14% … .Justice, -25% … Commerce, -34% [census has passed].”

Northeast Asia
China openly backs North Korea succession plan – report
[Reuters]
NKorea’s Kim Jong Il turning to designer fakes?
[AP]
US, South Korea Announce Major Military Exercises
[VOA]
US admiral: Carrier killer won’t stop US Navy
[AP]
Chinese inflation hits 4.9% pushed by high food prices
[BBC]
Japan mass food poisoning fears in Hokkaido schools
[BBC]

Southeast Asia/Pacific
Thai Soldier Wounded in Skirmish on Thai-Cambodia border
[BBC]
Talks begin to end 40-year Philippine insurgency
[FT]

South/Central Asia
Pakistan softens on issue of American’s immunity
[AP]

NAfrica/Middle East Protests
Egypt Initiates 10-Day Rewrite of Its Constitution
[NYT]
Muslim Brotherhood to form political party; Egypt’s generals reach out to protest leaders
[WaPo]
Tunisia migrants: Italy seeks EU cash over Lampedusa
[BBC]
Yemenis trying to oust leader protest for 5th day
[AP]
Second Man Dies in Bahrain Skirmishes
[WSJ] and Bahrain protesters take control of main square [AP]

Middle East
Iran unrest: MPs call for death of Mousavi and Karroubi
[BBC]
Clinton expresses US support for Iran protesters
[BBC]

Africa
Rebels blamed after 11 slain in eastern Congo
[AP]
Kenyan sailors welcomed after Somali pirate release
[BBC]
Wagalla massacre: Raila Odinga orders Kenya probe
[BBC]
China to build new Sudan airport in Khartoum
[BBC]
211 killed: S.Sudan says Khartoum arming rebels
[AP]

Europe
Russia Embraces Risky Offshore Arctic Drilling [NYT]
5 rebels, 3 police killed in Russia’s Caucasus
[AP]
Spontaneous strike paralyzes public transport in Brussels
[Deutsche Welle]
Silvio Berlusconi faces Ruby sex charge trial in April
[BBC]

Americas
Amazon pollution: Chevron hits back in row with Ecuador
[BBC]
Colombia nabs fully submersible drug submarine
[AP]

Domestic
Dalai Lama nephew hit by car, killed on Fla. walk
[AP]
Clinton to Promote Technology to Ensure Global Internet Freedom
[Bloomberg]
Clinton picks new U.S. envoy to Afghanistan, Pakistan
[Reuters]

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Daily International News 01.22.10

January 22, 2010

Daily International News
January 22, 2010

Japan
U.N. official says Japan’s aid to Haiti too little
[Reuters]
Support for Japan ruling party erodes amid scandal
[Reuters]

Koreas
N. Korea offers talks with S. Korea on border restrictions
[Yonhap]
N. Korea ranks last in U.S. economic freedom index
[Yonhap]

China
China urges U.S. to stop accusations on so-called Internet freedom
[Xinhua]

South Asia
India warns of hijack threat to national carrier
[Reuters]
Pakistan ‘wants unarmed drones’
[BBC]

Middle East
120 al-Qaida suspects detained in Turkey
[AP]
Iraq election chief: More candidates to be banned
[AP]

Europe
Russia says hopes for prompt U.S. nuclear deal
[Reuters]
Russia, U.S. to resume START talks early next month
[Xinhua]
Russia says to start up Iran nuclear plant this year
[Xinhua]

Africa
Nigeria cabinet told to rule on sick President Yar’Adua
[BBC]

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Why the Google.cn Issue Won’t Ruin Sino-US Relations

January 21, 2010

Among China watchers in Washington, DC , the big news today revolved around Secretary of State Hillary Clinton‘s speech on Internet Freedom. Given at the Newseum in downtown DC, Clinton railed lambasted governments and individuals who use communication networks like the Internet to lessen personal freedoms, human rights, and incite racial and political hatred. While some saw it as especially salient this week as Google decides whether or not it’s “Don’t Be Evil” motto can be upheld in its China operations, the bottom line is that no amount of verbal rhetoric or posturing can ultimately weaken the economic and regional security partnership of China and the United States.

Hillary Clinton has her ear to the ground on internet freedom.

Anticipating the Secretary’s speech today, the Vice Foreign Minister of China, He Yafei, tried to disentangle the Google.cn issue from overall Sino-US Relations. “The Google case should not be linked with relations between the two governments and countries; otherwise, it’s an over-interpretation,” he said, addressing a press conference in Beijing, then adding that “If foreign companies have different viewpoints with this regard, they should also seek solutions according to the law.”

But is this nothing new? Is the Vice FM correct in saying that this won’t hamper future relations? I think so and for a multitude of reasons. Primarily, President Obama has been extremely careful to lay down a good foundation upon which to build better Sino-US ties during his Presidency. I would think his scuttling of the human rights issue in Beijing, gentle refusal to meet the Dalai Lama before he met with Chinese leadership, and lengthy Asia trip extolling the virtues of the, what State Department Spokesman P.J. Crowley characterizes as a “broad, deep, expanding and durable relationship.”

Also, we must consider the implications for a negative turn in Sino-US relations. Even coming from a hippie optimist like myself, a dip in relations would affect our domestic economic situation (China increased its foreign reserves by $453 billion last year alone), regional security situation (China is the chair of the Six-Party Talks, aimed at bringing North Korea back to the table on nuclear weapons talks), and cultural influence (the US benefits just as much from cheap Chinese imports as the Chinese do from McDonald’s, Nike, and knock-off Playboy t-shirts…they’re more popular than you think).

Clinton today made several strong statements. She said “We stand for a single internet, where all of humanity has equal access to knowledge and ideas and we recognize that the world’s information infrastructure will become what we and others make of it.” But, she also said that “the United States and China have different views on this issue and we intend to address those differences candidly and consistently in the context of our positive, cooperative, and comprehensive relationship [italics mine].” Strong statement and Global Internet Initiatives aside, the U.S. is, and will remain, willing to work cooperatively with China on issues as seemingly black-and-white as human rights. The bottom line is that the U.S. has to – considering global and regional power relationships, there is no other choice.

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Daily International News 01.21.10

January 21, 2010

Daily International News
January 21, 2010

Koreas
Koreas end Kaesong estate talks without progress
[BBC]

China
China says Google case should not be linked to ties with U.S.
[Xinhua]
China on Path to Become Second-Largest Economy
[NYT]
Spain could ask EU to lift arms ban on China
[China Daily]
Hackers harass government sites
[China Daily] and Leading websites promise to fend off piracy [China Daily]
SMS returns to Xinjiang
[China Daily]

Middle East
Yemen stops airport visas to hamper militants
[Reuters]
New Israeli demand complicates US peace mission
[AP]
Netanyahu turns fire on Abbas as U.S. envoy flies in
[Reuters]
Iraq leader seeks ruling on committee behind ban
[AP]

Europe
Russia denies Baltic fleet boost over Patriot move
[Reuters]

Americas
Web Access Is New Clinton Doctrine [WSJ]
Dominican Republic offers to host Honduras’ Zelaya
[Reuters]
Conan O’Brien Seals Deal to Exit NBC
[WSJ]

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US-China Relations Outlook 2010: 什么样的关系?

January 13, 2010

A hearing on recent security developments in the People’s Republic of China provided a somewhat bleak outlook for the near future of US-China relations, echoing the wary sentiments of pundits and academics in recent weeks. Meeting at one of the House Visitors’ Centers’ many committee rooms this morning, the House Armed Services Committee heard testimony from top Department of Defense, State, and PACOM officials on what we can expect this year from the growing strength of China in the global arena.

In unusual agreement with pundits’ (see Robert Cohen’s recent NYT Op-Ed) and academics’ recent warnings concerning China’s military and economic might, Pacific Command Admiral Robert F. Willard, USN, expressed him uneasiness at China’s PLA capabilities. He said that China’s stated goals of peace and stability in the region and world are unmatched by their recent military buildup.

Building on issues of military might, Department of Defense A/S Wallace C. Gregson describes current US-Chinese relations as operating in a “dynamic environment with little historical precedent.” Positives in the relationship, which include China’s support of UN Security Council Resolution 1874  and anti-piracy efforts in the Gulf of Aden are matched by negatives such as an overall lack of transparency  and the pace and scope of their military buildup.

Concluding remarks came from Department of State Deputy A/S for East Asian and Pacific Affairs David B. Shear, who seemingly tried to re-prove to the House members how State officials have tried to engage the region in a dynamic and cooperative manner, bring up the numerous POTUS and Secretary trips to the region. However, his recap of the last year of efforts in Asia was darkened by a statement on the recent near-decision by Google to pull out its operations in China in light of an apparent cyberattack perpetrated by China against various Chinese human rights activists who use GMail. He reiterated today’s remarks from Secretary Clinton that State was briefed on the matter by Google previously and that a scheduled press conference on internet security and openness scheduled for next Thursday was scheduled prior to this fact.

The overall tone of all testimonies given seemed to parallel the feelings of many China watchers these days – although China is becoming more accountable to global norms of transparency and responsibility, this is only a natural change due to its increased presence on the global stage. Stated goals and dreams of peace by the PRC seem to be what they’ve always been – lipservice – and the PLA military buildup’s actions speak louder than these words. Wariness seems to be the best posture to be taken by the US at this point – wariness and preparedness. Within the next few weeks, China’s moves on the Google issue and on Iran sanctions could prove as a good litmus test to actions in the rest of 2010.