Posts Tagged ‘LDP’

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Daily International News 08.09.11

August 9, 2011

Daily International News
August 9, 2011

Northeast Asia
Japan
Nagasaki remembers A-bomb, US sends representative
[AP]
Japan to lift some nuclear evacuation advisories
[AP]
Japan Held Nuclear Data, Leaving Evacuees in Peril
[NYT]
LDP demands PM explain mysterious donations to political group
[Mainichi]
Koreas
North Korea says no way to opening up, or reform
[Reuters]
U.S. requests North Korea talks on war remains: report
[Reuters]
NKorea: Tropical storm causes casualties, damage
[AP]
China/Taiwan
Ai Weiwei resumes China criticism in Twitter messages
[BBC]
Defense Ministry says PLA’s operation in south China routine drill
[Xinhua]
China says it was targeted in 500,000 cyberattacks
[AP]
The first aircraft carrier hotel in China
[Xinhua]
China Inflation Quickening to 6.5% Limits Policy Response to Global Crisis
[Bloomberg]
Taiwan opposition says computers hacked by Chinese
[AP]
Taiwanese man sentenced on espionage charges
[AP]

Southeast Asia/Pacific
Saudi beheading fuels backlash in Indonesia
[WaPo]
Indonesia’s Muhammad Nazaruddin arrested in Colombia
[BBC]
World Bank blocks Cambodia loans amid Boeung Kak row
[BBC]

South/Central Asia
With war crimes heat on, Sri Lanka’s Rajapaksa goes to China
[Reuters]
Clashes erupt in Indian capital during anti-graft protest
[Reuters]
Obama pledges to press on in Afghan war
[Reuters]

Middle East
Syrian death toll rises as Arab states protest
[Guardian]
Syria calls on Turkey, Gulf countries to reconsider their stands: paper
[Xinhua]
Turkish foreign minister meets Syria’s Assad
[Al Jazeera]
Israel sends drones over Mediterranean gas fields
[AP]
Iraq’s Qaeda asks ex-fighters to return, threatens attacks
[Reuters]
Lebanon reports back to tribunal on Hariri probe
[Reuters]
Gunmen kill soldier in Yemen’s southern city Aden
[Reuters]

Africa
Rebels in captured town plan push towards Tripoli
[Reuters]
NATO dismisses report of Libyan civilian casualties in air strikes
[Xinhua]
Somalia famine: WFP begins 800-ton airlift of food
[AP]
Somalia offers al-Shabab amnesty
[Al Jazeera]

Europe
Further riots in London as violence spreads across England
[BBC]
UK PM recalls Parliament for London riot crisis
[AP]
Cargo plane crash kills 11 in Russian far east
[Reuters]

Domestic
Obama plan: Destroy Romney
[POLITICO]
Rick Perry to make 2012 intentions clear Saturday
[POLITICO]
Bachmann brushes off ‘wild-eyed’ photo
[POLITICO]
Stock markets bounce ahead of Fed meeting
[LAT]
New curfew for Philly teens as mayor blasts flash mobs
[LAT]
Republican control at stake in Wisconsin recall elections
[LAT]

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Daily International News 08.30.10

August 30, 2010

Phew! After flying to Boston on a few hours notice to see former President Jimmy Carter return AmCit Mr. Gomes to his family, I’m back from the state of Massachusetts (and also New Hampshire and Maine along the way…) with your daily news brief!

Daily International News
August 30, 2010

International
UN climate body ‘needs reforms’, review recommends
[BBC]

Northeast Asia
North Korea
North Korea ‘hopes for early nuclear talks restart’
[BBC]
Pyongyang’s New Leader for the Old Guard
[WSJ]
N.Korea accuses S.Korea of blocking access to Twitter
[AFP]
Chinese state TV confirms visit by NKorea’s Kim
[AP]

China
China Fortifies State Businesses to Fuel Growth
[NYT]
Will Chinese Mining Venture Bring Wealth or Heartbreak to Afghanistan?
[Politics Daily]
China media: Police accidentally killed Tibetan
[AP]
Op-ed: China’s economic model isn’t the answer for the U.S. [WaPo]
Op-ed from 08.29: Brazil, India and China — not quite superpowers yet [WaPo]

Japan
Japan’s Ozawa may drop from ruling party race – report
[Reuters]
World stocks up after Bank of Japan eases policy
[AP]

Southeast Asia
Myanmar parties complain election fee too high
[AP]
From 08.29 Top brass in Burma resign to run in poll [Bangkok Post]
Indonesia volcano erupts again after long dormancy
[BBC]

South/Central Asia
Afghan district chief killed in strike on compound
[AP]
India BlackBerry ban averted for 60 more days
[AP]
Flood spares historic town Thatta as waters recede
[DAWN]

Middle East
What can Obama say about Iraq?
[FP]
Israel rabbi calls for ‘plague’ on Mahmoud Abbas
[BBC]
From 08.29 Abbas: No peace talks with settlement building [AP]
From 08.29 Jordanian King Faces Backlash Over Role in the Peace Process [Medialine]
From 08.29 U.S. Commander Fears Political Stalemate in Iraq [NYT]
Dissident breaks with Egypt opposition on election
[AP]
Iran media call French first lady ‘prostitute’
[AP]

Africa
South Africa’s Zuma tells ministers to end strike
[BBC]
From 08.29 Obama administration intensifies efforts in Sudan [WaPo]

Europe/UK
First pictures of David Cameron’s new daughter released
[BBC]
Mandelson fears Labour U-turn ‘electoral cul-de-sac’
[BBC]
Superbug hits baby ward at University College Hospital
[BBC]
Gunman kills 6, wounds 9 in Slovakia
[AP]
Anger at German banker’s comments on Jews, Muslims
[AFP]

Americas/Domestic
Drilling to reach Chilean miners to begin
[CNN]
Economy Puts Democrats’ Senate Majority in Play: Albert R. Hunt
[Bloomberg]
Investors braced for week of key data
[FT]
Bernanke Faces Skepticism on Monetary-Policy Tools
[Bloomberg]
Muslims see Tennessee mosque fire as sign of hate
[Tennessean]
Beck Says Rally Illustrated Unhappiness With State of Nation
[Bloomberg]
Obama says not worried by Muslim “rumors”
[Reuters]
A Katrina Photographer Returns to New Orleans
[TIME]
Hurricane Earl lashes Caribbean, threatens US
[AP]

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Daily International News 07.09.10

July 9, 2010

Daily International News
July 9, 2010

Japan/Koreas
Japan DPJ may stumble in vote, fiscal reform at risk
[Reuters]
NKorea: Imprisoned American tried to kill himself
[AP]
NKorea proposes talks with US over ship sinking
[AP]
UNSC draft statement on Cheonan sinking
[Korea Times] and  UN condemns SKorea ship sinking [AP]
S. Korea approves new humanitarian assistance to N. Korea
[Yonhap]
Prosecutors raid SKorea prime minister’s office
[AP]

China
U.S. Presses China on Currency
[WSJ]
Google says Beijing renews China license
[AP]
China says Japanese reports on its military expenditure “groundless”
[Xinhua]
China finds more milk tainted with deadly melamine
[AP]

AfPak
Suicide bombers kill 62, wound 111 in Pakistan
[AP]
Taliban commander captured as NATO raids intensify
[AP]
Petraeus reviews directive meant to limit Afghan civilian deaths
[WaPo]

Europe/UK
U.S., Russia Swap Agents
[WSJ]
Cold War redux: US, Russia swap 14 spies in Vienna
[AP]
Slovak president appoints new government
[AP]
Italian journalists strike over Berlusconi wiretap bill
[BBC]
Trichet moves to shore up eurozone confidence
[EU Observer]
UK envoy’s praise for Lebanon cleric draws Israel anger
[BBC]
3 Britons Convicted in Plot to Blow Up Airliners
[NYT]

Middle East
Iraq: Suicide bomber kills 6 in Baghdad
[AP]

Africa
Somalia, at War, Rummages for Cash
[WSJ]
ICC Suspends Trial of Warlord Accused of Recruiting Child Soldiers
[All Africa]
Top Rwanda genocide suspect Uwinkindi pleads not guilty
[BBC]
Libya allows 400 Eritreans to stay
[AFP]

Domestic
Obama Presses BP to Recover More Oil
[NYT]
James Mattis, Marine Corps general, to take over U.S. Central Command
[WaPo]
IMF Urges U.S. to Consider Higher Taxes, Social Security Cuts
[WSJ]
Crowds storm streets after verdict in killing of unarmed black man
[CNN]

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Daily International News 06.02.10

June 2, 2010

Daily International News
June 2, 2010

Northeast Asia
Japan PM quits with FinMin Kan frontrunner for job
[Reuters]
Op-ed: Revolving door keeps turning in Japan [FT]
Op-ed: How Will Hatoyama Move Affect Global Relations? [WSJ]
N. Korea’s Kim Jong-il resurfaces after disappearing amid tension
[Yonhap]
South Koreans vote for local offices amid tensions
[AP]
S. Korea, U.S. mil-mil exercises in Yellow Sea next week
[Yonhap]

China/HK
China says no thanks to US defense chief
[AP]
Chinese premier starts two-day visit to Myanmar
[Xinhua]
China to further bilateral ties with Japan: FM
[Xinhua]
China cartoon brings reminder of Tiananmen, erased
[AP]
‘Goddess of Democracy’ creator deported, says lawmaker
[SCMP]
Foxconn raises worker pay by 30 pct after suicides
[AP]
Apple boss defends conditions at iPhone factory
[BBC]

Southeast/Central Asia
Thai PM survives confidence vote over Bangkok protests
[BBC]
Taliban Attacks Shake Afghan Peace Gathering
[NYT]

Middle East
Iran Says New sanctions could mean confrontation
[AFP]
Israel deports all activists from Gaza-bound ships
[AP]
Obama speaks with Turkish prime minister about flotilla raid
[CNN]
Mideast Peace Push May Survive Raid on Gaza Activists
[Bloomberg]
Gaza Situation ‘Unsustainable,’ Clinton Says as Ship Approaches
[Bloomberg]

Africa
Libyan executions of foreigners are condemned
[BBC]
US court rules ex-Somali PM can be sued over torture
[BBC]
Liberia sends seven to US on cocaine-smuggling charges
[BBC]

Europe
David Cameron’s first PMQ’s as Prime Minister [Times UK]
Balkan hopefuls meet EU leaders in Sarajevo [BBC]
Russia launching 520-day Mars mission simulation
[AP]
Polish Pilot Saw Chance of Landing
[NYT]
‘Morally bankrupt’ Sarah Ferguson weeps on Oprah
[Times UK]
Body of gunman found after Cumbria shootings
[Times UK]

Americas/Domestic
Cancun mayor charged with ties to drug cartels
[AP]
BP Gulf Spill Prompts Criminal, Civil Investigations by U.S.
[Bloomberg]
Gores Announce They’re Separating After 40 Years of Marriage
[Bloomberg]
Party switcher Parker Griffith, Rep. Arthur Davis lose in Alabama primaries
[WaPo]

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POST: Manhattan Project Implications on Japanese Politics

September 2, 2009

Last night I watched a very interesting documentary on the eagerness of one nation’s race to achieve a nuclear program, for the sole and (later) express purpose of delivering a viable nuclear weapon.

But this nation was not Iran or North Korea, or the former Soviet Union or India. It was the United States.

I realized, as I sifted through Netflix‘s “instant play” documentaries (the new not-so-guilty pleasure of my nights spent at home) that my knowledge and background concerning the experimentation and invention behind the first viable nuclear program – our own – was embarrassingly low.

The 50-minute program, from the History Channel’s Modern Marvels series, was surprisingly enlightening for such a short program. Beginning from the Nazi German scientists who first discovered uranium fission, continuing onto the newly arrived European scientists to America who assisted in the experimentation project, and even delving into the technical side of how fission occurs and why both plutonium and uranium were used and how, the documentary was extremely thorough. It also brought to light the immediate implications for the Project – socially, politically, and militarily.

J. Robert Oppenheimer, Professor. H. D. Smythe, General Nichols, and Glen Seaborg look at a snapshot of the atomic blast on Hiroshima in 1946. Oppenheimer was later stripped of his security clearance due to apparent "Communist sympathies."

J. Robert Oppenheimer, Professor. H. D. Smythe, General Nichols, and Glen Seaborg look at a snapshot of the atomic blast on Hiroshima in 1946. Oppenheimer was later stripped of his security clearance due to apparent "Communist sympathies."

The documentary spoke of the Project’s controversial legacy – as mankind’s self-created means to self-destruction, some saw it as the harbinger of nuclear winter and an embarrassment to the gentler side of the human spirit. Over 100 Manhattan Project scientists even signed a petition to require testing Little Boy before he was dropped on Hiroshima, an impossible demand considering they only had enough U-235 for one bomb. The documentary failed to mention that even after the bombs were dropped, another petition was issued that stated “We [the scientists of Metallurgical Laboratory in Chicago] feel, however, that such attacks on Japan could not be justified.” But, there are those who ardently support the opposite. Edward Teller, a Hungarian-American theoretical physicist and one of the Manhattan Project scientists who also helped engineer the Hydrogen Bomb, stated that he feels no regret over his part in the creation of the bombs. Citing America’s continued pursuit of peace and equality, he sees no other country better suited for the acquisition of such a responsibility.

But the implication of the Project and the two powerful destructive events it precipitated, unnamed in the documentary, and extremely salient after this weekend’s Japanese elections, is the continuing pacifist nature of Japanese political and ‘military’ affairs. Even though it was “no Obama moment,” this weekend’s landslide victory of the Democratic Party of Japan to Japan’s Lower House is important. Contrary to the increasingly militaristic (by their standards) half-a-century reign of the LDP in Japanese politics, the DPJ wants to back peddle on their military commitments in the region, especially those tied to the U.S. war machine. Some think this could complicate U.S. East Asian policy. But today, the DPJ President and PM-designate Yukio Hatoyama made clear that he does not wish to alienate the U.S., but wishes to create a more Asia-focused Japan policy that shies away from further ties to U.S. military commitments (see Futenma and Afghanistan refueling agreements).

The DPJ’s wish to renegotiate these agreements, however unlikely to happen, underscores the continued importance of the Manhattan Project and the nuclear arms race’s influences on Japanese society and politics. However much trouble it will or will not cause among the Japan and U.S. in coming months is unimportant compared to the DPJ sticking to its pacifist convictions and upholding a non-agressive stance that, I believe, will become the ideal for humanist, dignified states in the future.