Posts Tagged ‘pj crowley’

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Daily International News 03.29.11

March 29, 2011

Daily International News
March 29, 2011

Northeast Asia
Japan
Japan on ’maximum alert’ over nuclear crisis
[SMH]
Japan vows to review nuclear safety standards
[AP]
Japan works to stop radioactive water leaking into sea
[BBC]
Koreas
Two Koreas meet on volcano risk
[BBC]
N.Korea speaker makes rare address in the West
[AFP]
US representatives meet North Koreans at secluded German castle
[M&C]
NKorea closely monitoring radiation from Japan
[AP]
S. Korea does not oppose humanitarian food aid to N. Korea: Rep. Chung
[Yonhap]
China
Chinese president urges CPC members to excel in promoting social harmony
[Xinhua]
Dalai Lama’s announcement of “retirement” a farce, living buddha says
[Xinhua]

Southeast Asia/Pacific
Australia PM Julia Gillard’s computer ‘hacked’
[BBC]

South/Central Asia
Scandal-tainted Kabul Bank to be sold off
[Al Jazeera]
US Army apologises over new Afghanistan abuse images
[BBC]
UK pays Afghan civilians over deaths, injuries
[AP]
Indian investigators to visit Pakistan in Mumbai probe
[Reuters]
Pakistan says 13 soldiers killed in friendly fire incident
[Reuters]

Middle East
Israel considering annexing West Bank settlements
[AP]
Syrian Cabinet resigns amid unrest
[AP]
Syria unrest: Pro-Assad rallies in Damascus and Aleppo
[BBC]
Hostage siege kills 21 at Iraq government building
[AP]
Yemenis blame Saleh as security deteriorates
[Reuters]
Ammo factory blast in Yemen kills at least 121
[CNN]

Africa
Libya Related
FACT CHECK: How Obama’s Libya claims fit the facts
[AP]
The Obama doctrine
[WaPo]
Analysis: Obama doesn’t mention Libyan rebels
[AP]
Obama Left Libya Questions Unanswered, Critics in Congress Say
[Bloomberg]
Obama on Libya: The Doctrine Is Clear, but the Mission Isn’t
[Swampland]
Obama’s Libya Speech: Daily Beast Contributors Weigh In
[Daily Beast]
London talks focus on Libya’s future
[FT]
Libya Airstrikes Make Woodward First Woman to Lead U.S. Air War
[Bloomberg]
Italian islanders block harbor to prevent influx of NAfrican migrants
[Deutsche Welle]
Non-Libya Related
Official: Ivory Coast rebels take 2 more towns
[AP]
Zimbabwe to take over all foreign-owned mining firms
[AFP]
Sudan president heads to Qatar amid Darfur violence
[AFP]

Europe
Russia ‘kills 17 North Caucasus militants’
[BBC]
Rating cut deepens Portugal’s financial woes
[AP]
Labour claims 20,000 police officers will be forced to retire
[BBC]
Prince Harry joins injured soldiers’ North Pole trek
[BBC]

Americas
Carter in Cuba for meetings with Raúl, Ortega
[Miami Herald]

Domestic
Why I called Bradley Manning’s treatment ‘stupid’ [Guardian]
Dick Durbin’s hearing on the civil rights of American Muslims (live blog)
[WaPo]
Donald Trump defends ‘birther’ claims
[WaPo]
Despite pressure to reduce national debt, few in Congress use payback program
[WaPo]
With “time short,” Congress still at impasse on shutdown talks
[WaPo]
US house prices ‘hitting new lows’
[BBC]
BP Managers Said to Face U.S. Manslaughter Charges Review
[Bloomberg]

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Daily International News 03.15.11

March 15, 2011

Daily International News
March 15, 2011

Japan Quake/Tsunami/Nuclear Issues
Op-ed: Nuclear power in disarray
[Japan Times]

Japan earthquake: Radiation levels fall at Fukushima
[BBC]
Japan’s nuclear crisis deepens
[FT]
Japan PM meets destiny in tsunami tragedy
[AP]
For Elderly, Echoes of World War II Horrors
[NYT]
International Nuclear Issues
Reactors in U.S. Quake Zones May Be Key to Nuclear Plans
[Bloomberg]
Indonesia nuclear reactor plans ‘to go-ahead’
[BBC]
Germany to shut down pre-1980 nuclear plants
[Reuters]
EU to consider nuclear stress tests
[AP]

Koreas/China
North Korea ‘ready to discuss nuclear enrichment’
[BBC]
North Korea Finally Accepts 27
[Daily NK]
Tibetans urge Dalai Lama to stay on as leader
[AP]

China Says Yuan Currency Not on Nanjing Agenda
[ABC]
Shanghai high-rise fire: China ‘to prosecute 24 people’
[BBC]
China prepares to pull its citizens from NE Japan
[AP]

Southeast Asia/Pacific
Parcel bomb targets Indonesian politician
[BBC]
Nepal stops using images of former king on banknotes
[BBC]

South/Central Asia
Pakistan Defers Ruling on C.I.A. Operative
[NYT]

Bombs kill Afghan official, school principal
[AP]
Corruption ‘threatens India’s economic growth’
[BBC]
Bangladesh Court adjourns microcredit pioneer’s appeal
[BBC]

Middle East
U.S.-Saudi Tensions Intensify With Mideast Turmoil
[NYT]
Bahrain king declares state of emergency after protests
[BBC]

Iran denounces foreign troops in Bahrain
[BBC]
Hamas leader calls on Abbas for talks
[Xinhua]

Thousands of Palestinians rally for reconciliation
[AP]
Israel seizes ship with Iran arms for Gaza-Netanyahu
[Reuters]
Oman protesters push political, wage demands
[Reuters]
2 Kurdish officials resign in volatile Iraqi city
[AP]

Africa
G8 ministers turn to UN on Libya violence
[AP]

Clinton pressing Egyptian transition leaders
[AP]
Clinton Hears Requests for Help from Libyan Opposition in Paris Meeting
[Bloomberg]
Chavez, allies lead push for Libya mediation
[AP]
Libya: Government and rebels still battling for Brega
[BBC]
Qaddafi Forces Resume Air Attacks on Retreating Libyan Rebels
[Bloomberg]
Ivory Coast Fighting Escalates
[WSJ]
Niger: Issoufou Wins Vote in Next Step to Civilian Rule
[All Africa]

Europe
Italy blocks ferry of Moroccans fleeing Libya
[BBC]
EU Agrees on Economic Overhaul
[WSJ]
Tickets for London 2012 Olympics go on sale
[Deutsche Welle]
UK gov’t prepares to offer changes to libel law
[AP]

Americas
Mexico prison warden stabbed to death during her rounds
[BBC]
From 03/14 Guatemalans sue US over syphilis tests [BBC]
From 03/14 Cuba devalues currency to match US dollar [BBC]

Domestic
Candidates emerge to replace Mueller at FBI
[WaPo]
Petraeus positive about US Afghanistan progress
[BBC]

Poll: Nearly two-thirds of Americans say Afghan war isn’t worth fighting
[WaPo]
Could ‘No Child’ get left behind?
[POLITICO]
N.R.A. Declines to Meet With Obama on Gun Policy
[NYT]
Nasdaq ‘to make rival bid’ for NYSE Euronext
[BBC]
Editorial: The Abuse of Private Manning
[NYT]
Editorial: Punishing Pfc. Manning
[LA Times]

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Daily International News 03.14.11

March 14, 2011

Daily International News
March 14, 2011

Northeast Asia
US pulls ships, aircraft from Japan nuke plant
[AP]
Japan Battles Nuclear Meltdown as Millions Without Power, Water
[Bloomberg]
Second Explosion at Reactor as Technicians Try to Contain Damage
[NYT]
Japan earthquake, tsunami death toll likely above 10,000; survivors worry about supplies
[WaPo]
Quake Moves Japan Closer to U.S. and Alters Earth’s Spin
[NYT]
BOJ pumps $183bn to calm markets as stocks tumble
[BBC]
China rules out faster yuan rise despite soaring prices
[BBC]
Chinese premier calls for political reform
[BBC]

Southeast Asia/Pacific
Thailand: More ‘red-shirts’ released ahead of elections
[BBC]
Tear gas used on Christmas Island asylum protesters
[BBC]

South/Central Asia
Pakistan court dodges decision on CIA contractor’s immunity
[Reuters]
Suicide attack on Afghan army centre kills at least 37
[Reuters]
Indian navy captures 61 pirates in Arabian Sea
[AP]

Middle East
Saudi sends troops, Bahrain Shi’ites call it “war”
[Reuters]
Israel to expand West Bank settlements in response to settler slayings
[WaPo]
Violent protests across Yemen, 3 soldiers dead
[Reuters]

Africa
Clinton Trip Boosts Egypt, Tunisia Democracy While Libya Waits
[Bloomberg]
France steps up efforts for Libya no-fly zone
[Reuters]
Libya gains control of more rebel territory
[WaPo]
Fighting breaks out in Ivory Coast Gbagbo stronghold
[Reuters]

Europe
Ruling Party Is Accused of Fraud in Russian Vote
[NYT]
Swiss suspend plans for new nuclear plants
[AP]

Domestic
Obama to Reiterate Call to Overhaul Bush-Era Education Law
[Bloomberg]
President Obama: We must seek agreement on gun reforms
[Arizona Star]
Who would lead the Democratic National Committee?
[WaPo]
‘Palin’s becoming Al Sharpton, Alaska edition’
[POLITICO]
Obama Owns The Treatment Of Manning Now [Atlantic]

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Why the Google.cn Issue Won’t Ruin Sino-US Relations

January 21, 2010

Among China watchers in Washington, DC , the big news today revolved around Secretary of State Hillary Clinton‘s speech on Internet Freedom. Given at the Newseum in downtown DC, Clinton railed lambasted governments and individuals who use communication networks like the Internet to lessen personal freedoms, human rights, and incite racial and political hatred. While some saw it as especially salient this week as Google decides whether or not it’s “Don’t Be Evil” motto can be upheld in its China operations, the bottom line is that no amount of verbal rhetoric or posturing can ultimately weaken the economic and regional security partnership of China and the United States.

Hillary Clinton has her ear to the ground on internet freedom.

Anticipating the Secretary’s speech today, the Vice Foreign Minister of China, He Yafei, tried to disentangle the Google.cn issue from overall Sino-US Relations. “The Google case should not be linked with relations between the two governments and countries; otherwise, it’s an over-interpretation,” he said, addressing a press conference in Beijing, then adding that “If foreign companies have different viewpoints with this regard, they should also seek solutions according to the law.”

But is this nothing new? Is the Vice FM correct in saying that this won’t hamper future relations? I think so and for a multitude of reasons. Primarily, President Obama has been extremely careful to lay down a good foundation upon which to build better Sino-US ties during his Presidency. I would think his scuttling of the human rights issue in Beijing, gentle refusal to meet the Dalai Lama before he met with Chinese leadership, and lengthy Asia trip extolling the virtues of the, what State Department Spokesman P.J. Crowley characterizes as a “broad, deep, expanding and durable relationship.”

Also, we must consider the implications for a negative turn in Sino-US relations. Even coming from a hippie optimist like myself, a dip in relations would affect our domestic economic situation (China increased its foreign reserves by $453 billion last year alone), regional security situation (China is the chair of the Six-Party Talks, aimed at bringing North Korea back to the table on nuclear weapons talks), and cultural influence (the US benefits just as much from cheap Chinese imports as the Chinese do from McDonald’s, Nike, and knock-off Playboy t-shirts…they’re more popular than you think).

Clinton today made several strong statements. She said “We stand for a single internet, where all of humanity has equal access to knowledge and ideas and we recognize that the world’s information infrastructure will become what we and others make of it.” But, she also said that “the United States and China have different views on this issue and we intend to address those differences candidly and consistently in the context of our positive, cooperative, and comprehensive relationship [italics mine].” Strong statement and Global Internet Initiatives aside, the U.S. is, and will remain, willing to work cooperatively with China on issues as seemingly black-and-white as human rights. The bottom line is that the U.S. has to – considering global and regional power relationships, there is no other choice.

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POST: What to Expect from Stephen Bosworth’s Trip to the DPRK

December 8, 2009

This week, Stephen W. Bosworth goes to Pyongyang. As the highest US administration official to visit the once termed “hermit state” since Assistant Secretary Chris Hill visited  in October 2008, media speculation is running rampant. But what seems to be consistent in the calculated guesswork not only of the fourth estate as well as former administration officials, academics, and other North Korea watchers, are low expectations. “An immediate return to Six-Party Talks, complete denuclearization, and the singing of the angels” – this is not going to be the tag line of any forthcoming story on US-DPRK negotiations for some time. But, then, why is he going?

Although the tone of some in the international community and many pundits has been somber, agreement is also pervasive that when the North accepts an offer to meet and extends a formal invitation, one doesn’t put it at the bottom of the Holiday Party invite pile and move on. One accepts. For lack of a better option, we have to accept. This is due purely to the fact that no movement by either side during a meeting still allows both sides to shake hands, take some pictures, and appear to be moving towards some common goal. It’s likely to be mostly lip-service – but that’s okay, and here’s why.

This morning, in a briefing given to press at the Korea Economic Institute in Washington, former Bush Administration Special Envoy to North Korea Jack Pritchard laid out the impressions he and colleagues received in a recent trip to the DPRK. Other than the insight into North Korean daily life that we all enjoy and, dare I say it, crave, he also bluntly stated that he doesn’t expect a breakthrough during Ambassador Bosworth’s trip. The North, he stated, are reverting to their 2005 LWR (light water reactor) stalling tactic, this time citing the preemptive need for a US-DPRK peace treaty before returning to the Six-Party process. The headlines are almost identical – “US will only discuss LWR after NKorea rejoins nuclear treaty” from Sept. 19, 2005 mirrors “South Korea Wednesday questioned North Korea’s calls for a peace treaty with the United States, declaring its real aim is to buy time to make more nuclear weapons” from this morning.

These lackluster expectations are echoed by many previously involved in North Korea negotiations, including Georgetown Professor (woot!) and former Director for Asian Affairs at the NSC Victor Cha. In a interview with Politics-Pwn3d he stated that this trip is  “not likely to lead to any major breakthrough, but what it will be effective at doing is moving the Chinese” because only then will the US be able to go to them, after a failure to bring them back to talks and say, “All right, we did it.  Now, help us get ‘em back to the Six Party Talks.” In a nutshell, his trip is “a good way of demonstrating U.S. leadership, U.S. initiative, U.S. political commitment, to the talks and the negotiations, but it’s also a good way of getting the Chinese to work a little harder.”

This is an old tactic and the administration knows it. In the daily briefing to press at the State Department this afternoon, Asst. Sec. PJ Crowley stated that “we have a fairly good understanding of how North Korea operates in these kinds of settings. It’s unlikely their response will be, ‘yeah, we’ll meet you a week from Tuesday.'” He also acknowledged that the administration would not be surprised if superfluous issues came up during the Bosworth talks, but continued to state that these issues would and could be dealt with at a later date.

So what now? Well, due to North Korean being “the dark side of the moon” as Mr. Crowley characterized today, contact with Bosworth will be extremely limited until Thursday, when he is (planned to) fly back to Seoul via Beijing where he will address awaiting press. Most envision future consultations and much stalemating by the North before any decisions are made on the future of the Six-Party process and, hand-in-hand, US-DPRK relations. But this is okay. Both sides are sitting down at the table and after the disastrous Hill visits of the ‘noughties’ and the North’s nuclear test this year, not much can be worse.

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